Author Archives: Friar Timothy, Franciscan Urban Mission, INC.

About Friar Timothy, Franciscan Urban Mission, INC.

Disciple of Jesus Christ with a Progressive Message, Author, Franciscan Friar, Musician, Social Activist, and Urban Missionary

The Planks of my Personal Political Views – A Democrat in the spirit of new progressive thought

A Democrat in the spirit of new progressive thought

 

I am pro-life in the sense that I oppose abortion on demand for the purpose of contraception. I oppose late term, midterm, and early abortion for the lack of forethought in the use of other forms of contraception.

I am pro-choice in the sense that women should choose to use effective contraception if they are sexually active in order to prevent pregnancy.

I am against the intrusion of the Government, however, in the right to free choice. Abortion should be safe, legal, and very rare.

I am pro-immigration legally into the United States by all people, and for immigration reform.

I am pro fighting the war on drugs, starting with the abuse of them in the United States which is responsible for 80% of the world’s drug imports.

I am pro II amendment rights, while at the same time regulation of the kinds of weapons being sold, and limiting all gun sales to a five-day waiting period, including stopping the immediate sale at gun shows.

I am socially liberal and physically conservative.

I am in favor of fair taxation designed to rebuild the middle class, pull those in poverty up out of the poor class, and the responsibility of the wealthy to pay their fair share. Fair and equal sacrifice.

I am for Universal Health care in a capital society.

I am for Social Security and stopping the borrowing against the trust fund, investing the American contributions into a growth oriented fund.

I am for fair and equal global trade.

I am for helping third world nations rebuild their nations into productive democracies so that their own people will prosper, and will have no need to immigrate elsewhere.

I for the proliferation of all Nuclear Arms on Planet Earth

I am for environmental responsibly and accountability over our Planet

 

 

 


New Hope for Non-Transmission of HIV to Partners

A new study convened on 58.000 couples, that’s right, fifty-eight thousand, where one person was HIV positive and the other was negative. in each case the POZ partner had an undetectable viral load. At the conclusion of the study, there were no transmissions of the virus to the negative partner. This brings in a new era of emphasis upon staying current with medications to keep the viral load from becoming detectable, making it possible for heterosexual couples to conceive children safely and all couples to have safe, enjoyable sex with less stress and concern. Thank the Lord for science, medicine and research.


The First Lady Speaks to the Graduates of CCNY

In response to a post that called Michelle Obama the Slave Master of the white house, I am posting the full transcription of her Commencement Speech from last Friday at CCNY and the full transcript. Michelle simply stated, while inspiring the graduates about the American Dream, that the White House had been built by Slaves, which is true. To Make a racist comment that she is a Slave Master by being the First Lady Living there is counter intuitive. The first Lady was merely inspiring her young audience with the american dream by stating the she, and Afro-American woman, can now live freely in a place that was once built by slaves for white only occupants. The Obama’s have made world History by becoming the first President and First lady of color elected to the White house.

The full video is beneath the transcript. It is a wonderful inspiring truthful speech.

The White House

Office of the First Lady

For Immediate ReleaseJune 03, 2016
Remarks by the First Lady at City College of New York Commencement
City College of New York
New York, New York
12:19 P.M. EDT
MRS. OBAMA: Wow! (Applause.) Let me just take it in. First of all, it is beyond a pleasure and an honor to be here to celebrate the City College of New York Class of 2016! You all, I mean, this has been the most fun I think I’ve had at a commencement ever. (Applause.)
Let me just say a few thank yous. Let me start, of course, by thanking President Coico for that wonderful introduction, for her leadership here at City College, for this honorary degree.
I also want to recognize Senator Schumer, Chancellor Milliken, Trustee Shorter, Edward Plotkin, as well as your amazing valedictorian, Antonios Mourdoukoutas — did I get it right? (Applause.) And your amazing salutatorian, Orubba Almansouri. (Applause.) I really don’t want to follow those two. (Laughter.) If anybody is wondering about the quality of education, just listening to those two speakers lets you know what’s happening here. And I’m so proud of you both — and to your families, congratulations. Well done. Well done. (Applause.)
And of course, let us not forget Elizabeth Aklilu for her amazing performance of the National Anthem earlier today. She blew it out of the water. (Applause.)
But most of all, I want to acknowledge all of you -– the brilliant, talented, ambitious, accomplished, and all-around outstanding members of the class of 2016! Woo! (Applause.) You give me chills. You all have worked so hard and come so far to reach this milestone, so I know this is a big day for all of you and your families, and for everyone at this school who supported you on this journey.
And in many ways, this is a big day for me too. See, this is my very last commencement address as First Lady of the United States. This is it. (Applause.) So I just want to take it all in. And I think this was the perfect place to be, because this is my last chance to share my love and admiration, and hopefully a little bit of wisdom with a graduating class.
And, graduates, I really want you all to know that there is a reason why, of all of the colleges and universities in this country, I chose this particular school in this particular city for this special moment. (Applause.) And I’m here because of all of you. I mean, we’ve talked about it — Antonios, I’m going to talk a little bit about diversity, thank you. (Laughter.)
Just look around. Look at who you are. Look at where we’re gathered today. As the President eloquently said, at this school, you represent more than 150 nationalities. You speak more than 100 different languages — whoa, just stop there. You represent just about every possible background -– every color and culture, every faith and walk of life. And you’ve taken so many different paths to this moment.
Maybe your family has been in this city for generations, or maybe, like my family, they came to this country centuries ago in chains. Maybe they just arrived here recently, determined to give you a better life.
But, graduates, no matter where your journey started, you have all made it here today through the same combination of unyielding determination, sacrifice, and a whole lot of hard work -– commuting hours each day to class, some of you. (Applause.) Yes, amen. (Laughter.) Juggling multiple jobs to support your families and pay your tuition. (Applause.) Studying late into the night, early in the morning; on subways and buses, and in those few precious minutes during breaks at work.
And somehow, you still found time to give back to your communities –- tutoring young people, reading to kids, volunteering at hospitals. Somehow, you still managed to do prestigious internships and research fellowships, and join all kinds of clubs and activities. And here at this nationally-ranked university, with a rigorous curriculum and renowned faculty, you rose to the challenge, distinguishing yourselves in your classes, winning countless honors and awards, and getting into top graduate schools across this country. Whoa. (Laughter.)
So, graduates, with your glorious diversity, with your remarkable accomplishments and your deep commitment to your communities, you all embody the very purpose of this school’s founding. And, more importantly, you embody the very hopes and dreams carved into the base of that iconic statue not so far from where we sit — on that island where so many of your predecessors at this school first set foot on our shores.
And that is why I wanted to be here today at City College. I wanted to be here to celebrate all of you, this school, this city. (Applause.) Because I know that there is no better way to celebrate this great country than being here with you.
See, all of you know, for centuries, this city has been the gateway to America for so many striving, hope-filled immigrants — folks who left behind everything they knew to seek out this land of opportunity that they dreamed of. And so many of those folks, for them, this school was the gateway to actually realizing that opportunity in their lives, founded on the fundamental truth that talent and ambition know no distinctions of race, nationality, wealth, or fame, and dedicated to the ideals that our Founding Fathers put forth more than two centuries ago: That we are all created equal, all entitled to “life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness.” City College became a haven for brilliant, motivated students of every background, a place where they didn’t have to hide their last names or their accents, or put on any kind of airs because the students at this school were selected based not on pedigree, but on merit, and merit alone. (Applause.)
So really, it is no accident that this institution has produced 10 Nobel Prize winners — (applause) — along with countless captains of industry, cultural icons, leaders at the highest levels of government. Because talent and effort combined with our various backgrounds and life experiences has always been the lifeblood of our singular American genius.
Just take the example of the great American lyricist, Ira Gershwin, who attended City College a century ago. The son of a Russian-Jewish immigrant, his songs still light up Broadway today. Or consider the story of the former CEO of Intel, Andrew Grove, class of 1960. (Applause.) He was a Hungarian immigrant whose harrowing escape from Nazism and communism shaped both his talent for business and his commitment to philanthropy.
And just think about the students in this very graduating class –- students like the economics and pre-law major from Albania, who also completed the requirements for a philosophy major and dreams of being a public intellectual. The educational theater student from right here in Harlem who’s already an award-winning playwright and recently spoke at the White House. The biomedical science major who was born in Afghanistan and plans to be a doctor, a policy maker and an educator. (Applause.) And your salutatorian, whose Yemeni roots inspired her to study Yemini women’s writing and to advocate for girls in her community, urging them to find their own voices, to tell their own stories. I could go on.
These are just four of the nearly 4,000 unique and amazing stories in this graduating class –- stories that have converged here at City College, this dynamic, inclusive place where you all have had the chance to really get to know each other, to listen to each other’s languages, to enjoy each other’s food — lasagna, obviously — (laughter) — music, and holidays. Debating each other’s ideas, pushing each other to question old assumptions and consider new perspectives.
And those interactions have been such a critical part of your education at this school. Those moments when your classmates showed you that your stubborn opinion wasn’t all that well-informed — mmm hmm. (Laughter.) Or when they opened your eyes to an injustice you never knew existed. Or when they helped you with a question that you couldn’t have possibly answered on your own.
I think your valedictorian put it best — and this is a quote — he said, “The sole irreplaceable component of my CCNY experience came from learning alongside people with life experiences strikingly different from my own.” He said, “I have learned that diversity in human experience gives rise to diversity in thought, which creates distinct ideas and methods of problem solving.” That was an okay quote. (Laughter and applause.) Okay, you’re bright. (Laughter.) I couldn’t have said it better myself.
That is the power of our differences to make us smarter and more creative. And that is how all those infusions of new cultures and ideas, generation after generation, created the matchless alchemy of our melting pot and helped us build the strongest, most vibrant, most prosperous nation on the planet, right here. (Applause.)
But unfortunately, graduates, despite the lessons of our history and the truth of your experience here at City College, some folks out there today seem to have a very different perspective. They seem to view our diversity as a threat to be contained rather than as a resource to be tapped. They tell us to be afraid of those who are different, to be suspicious of those with whom we disagree. They act as if name-calling is an acceptable substitute for thoughtful debate, as if anger and intolerance should be our default state rather than the optimism and openness that have always been the engine of our progress.
But, graduates, I can tell you, as First Lady, I have had the privilege of traveling around the world and visiting dozens of different countries, and I have seen what happens when ideas like these take hold. I have seen how leaders who rule by intimidation –- leaders who demonize and dehumanize entire groups of people –- often do so because they have nothing else to offer. And I have seen how places that stifle the voices and dismiss the potential of their citizens are diminished; how they are less vital, less hopeful, less free.
Graduates, that is not who we are. That is not what this country stands for. (Applause.) No, here in America, we don’t let our differences tear us apart. Not here. Because we know that our greatness comes when we appreciate each other’s strengths, when we learn from each other, when we lean on each other. Because in this country, it’s never been each person for themselves. No, we’re all in this together. We always have been.
And here in America, we don’t give in to our fears. We don’t build up walls to keep people out because we know that our greatness has always depended on contributions from people who were born elsewhere but sought out this country and made it their home -– from innovations like Google and eBay to inventions like the artificial heart, the telephone, even the blue jeans; to beloved patriotic songs like “God Bless America,” like national landmarks like the Brooklyn Bridge and, yes, the White House -– both of which were designed by architects who were immigrants. (Applause.)
Finally, graduates, our greatness has never, ever come from sitting back and feeling entitled to what we have. It’s never come from folks who climb the ladder of success, or who happen to be born near the top and then pull that ladder up after themselves. No, our greatness has always come from people who expect nothing and take nothing for granted — folks who work hard for what they have then reach back and help others after them.
That is your story, graduates, and that is the story of your families. (Applause.) And it’s the story of my family, too. As many of you know, I grew up in a working class family in Chicago. And while neither of my parents went past high school, let me tell you, they saved up every penny that my dad earned at his city job because they were determined to send me to college.
And even after my father was diagnosed with Multiple Sclerosis and he struggled to walk, relying on crutches just to get himself out of bed each morning, my father hardly ever missed a day of work. See, that blue-collar job helped to pay the small portion of my college tuition that wasn’t covered by loans or grants or my work-study or my summer jobs. And my dad was so proud to pay that tuition bill on time each month, even taking out loans when he fell short. See, he never wanted me to miss a registration deadline because his check was late. That’s my story.
And, graduates, you all have faced challenges far greater than anything I or my family have ever experienced, challenges that most college students could never even imagine. Some of you have been homeless. Some of you have risked the rejection of your families to pursue your education. Many of you have lain awake at night wondering how on Earth you were going to support your parents and your kids and still pay tuition. And many of you know what it’s like to live not just month to month or day to day, but meal to meal.
But, graduates, let me tell you, you should never, ever be embarrassed by those struggles. You should never view your challenges as a disadvantage. Instead, it’s important for you to understand that your experience facing and overcoming adversity is actually one of your biggest advantages. And I know that because I’ve seen it myself, not just as a student working my way through school, but years later when I became — before I came to the White House and I worked as a dean at a college.
In that role, I encountered students who had every advantage –- their parents paid their full tuition, they lived in beautiful campus dorms. They had every material possession a college kid could want –- cars, computers, spending money. But when some of them got their first bad grade, they just fell apart. They lost it, because they were ill-equipped to handle their first encounter with disappointment or falling short.
But, graduates, as you all know, life will put many obstacles in your path that are far worse than a bad grade. You’ll have unreasonable bosses and difficult clients and patients. You’ll experience illnesses and losses, crises and setbacks that will come out of nowhere and knock you off your feet. But unlike so many other young people, you have already developed the resilience and the maturity that you need to pick yourself up and dust yourself off and keep moving through the pain, keep moving forward. You have developed that muscle. (Applause.)
And with the education you’ve gotten at this fine school, and the experiences you’ve had in your lives, let me tell you, nothing -– and I mean nothing -– is going to stop you from fulfilling your dreams. And you deserve every last one of the successes that I know you will have.
But I also want to be very clear that with those successes comes a set of obligations –- to share the lessons you’ve learned here at this school. The obligation to use the opportunities you’ve had to help others. That means raising your hand when you get a seat in that board meeting and asking the question, well, whose voices aren’t being heard here? What ideas are we missing? It means adding your voice to our national conversation, speaking out for our most cherished values of liberty, opportunity, inclusion, and respect –- the values that you’ve been living here at this school.
It means reaching back to help young people who’ve been left out and left behind, helping them prepare for college, helping them pay for college, making sure that great public universities like this one have the funding and support that they need. (Applause.) Because we all know that public universities have always been one of the greatest drivers of our prosperity, lifting countless people into the middle class, creating jobs and wealth all across this nation.
Public education is our greatest pathway to opportunity in America. So we need to invest in and strengthen our public universities today, and for generations to come. (Applause.) That is how you will do your part to live up to the oath that you all will take here today –- the oath taken by generations of graduates before you to make your city and your world “greater, better, and more beautiful.”
More than anything else, graduates, that is the American story. It’s your story and the story of those who came before you at this school. It’s the story of the son of Polish immigrants named Jonas Salk who toiled for years in a lab until he discovered a vaccine that saved countless lives. It’s the story of the son of immigrant — Jamaican immigrants named Colin Powell who became a four star general, Secretary of State, and a role model for young people across the country.
And, graduates, it’s the story that I witness every single day when I wake up in a house that was built by slaves, and I watch my daughters –- two beautiful, black young women -– head off to school — (applause) — waving goodbye to their father, the President of the United States, the son of a man from Kenya who came here to American — to America for the same reasons as many of you: To get an education and improve his prospects in life.
So, graduates, while I think it’s fair to say that our Founding Fathers never could have imagined this day, all of you are very much the fruits of their vision. Their legacy is very much your legacy and your inheritance. And don’t let anybody tell you differently. You are the living, breathing proof that the American Dream endures in our time. It’s you.
So I want you all to go out there. Be great. Build great lives for yourselves. Enjoy the liberties that you have in this great country. Pursue your own version of happiness. And please, please, always, always do your part to help others do the same.
I love you all. I am so proud of you. (Applause.) Thank you for allowing me to share this final commencement with you. I have so much faith in who you will be. Just keep working hard and keep the faith. I can’t wait to see what you all achieve in the years ahead.
Thank you all. God bless. Good luck on the road ahead. (Applause.)
END
12:41 P.M. EDT

A Resonse to Julianni’s Question at the RNC 2016 – What Happened to One America

Julianni – here is what happened to “one America” – The right wing went ultra right, wanting to take away benefits from Seniors and the disabled. Wanting to take away health care from people who cant afford it. Wanting to keep low taxes on the 1% who control 90% of the wealth and putting the greatest part of the tax burden on the poorest classes, squeezing out the middle class altogether and destroying the American Dream.
When you want to further disenfranchise the black population by not renewing the voting rights act of 1965, by lowering tuition subsidies for low income students, by not passing housing, job, and civil rights for all people, including LGBT persons, or those who have HIV and are perceived as being LGBT. By your rhetoric and disdain for folks who have different religious beliefs than you do…by pointing the finger at your political opposites for mistakes that are far less important than the crimes of those such as Christie the druggie, Nixon the evidence destroyer, Bush II the federal money launderer, Cheney, the corporate contract favor….

That is why there is Division because of your self righteousness and rhetoric.


DIVISIVENESS IS NOT DIVERSITY

vvvdvdvv

I have never found that conservatism promotes diversity. I have always found that conservatism realistically puts everyone in a cookie cutter and promotes uniformity. I do not think that conservatives understand the definition of diversity, nor why there is strength through diversity. Diversity is not divisiveness, as a democratic society. The state Motto of Kentucky is “United we stand, divided we fall” pointing to strength from diversity.The state seal pictures a member of each party, one from the left and one from the right shaking hands. The mnemonic “E unibus pluram” is the motto of the United States Economic system, “out of many, one”. WE are melting pot of DIVERSE people, and that should be celebrated, protected, and yes it is why we have a Constitution and bill of rights to protect the rights of all people and to prevent one religious philosophy from imposing their brand of religion upon others. Unity does not mean, in the scope of America, that everyone has to think the same, look the same, talk the same. No, progressive socialism teaches just the opposite. Even in the beginning of our nation, puritans, Lutherans, Calvinists, and pluralists formed this nation to keep their diverse rights in place and prevent one sect from ruling the other by religion through law, which is what they fled England from. King Henry Viii thru out Rome and made Anglican the law of the land, and killed anyone who would not convert. Queen Elizabeth changed England back to Roman Catholicism and killed anyone who would not convert back to that. King James changed the religion of England Back to Anglicanism and did the same. American was founded on the rights of diverse people to co-exist freely. and thereby protect the FREEDOM of Religion for all people who would immigrate to Her. You have the freedom to practice your religious belief, and perhaps if you really did, you would really reach an society that does not know the true God of Christianity. Just food for thought… perhaps you are and if so, keep it up, and stop blaming Progressive Democrats for the sinful woes of society.


Stay in The House

CHURCH

Bring me to the house of power Where God’s angels rest and roam Bring me to the house of power Whe -e all sinners may call home

Bring me to the house of power Return my heart to flesh from stone Bring me to the house of power I’ll seek forgiveness and be not alone

Bring me to the house of power Where from transgression I atone Bring me to the house of power Where I became a Jesus clone

Brine me to the house of power I awiiit my journey to my final home Where in that final hour


lam

loved and not alone


Written by: C. A. Shelley© September 9,2015



Waiting for the Bus

” Then the LORD appeared to Solomon in the night and said to him: “I have heard your prayer and have chosen this place for myself as a house of sacrifice.
When I shut up the heavens so that there is no rain, or command the locust to devour the land, or send pestilence among my people,  if my people who are called by my name humble themselves, and pray and seek my face and turn from their wicked ways, then I will hear from heaven and will forgive their sin and heal their land.  Now my eyes will be open and my ears attentive to the prayer that is made in this place.”
2 Ch 7:12-15 K JV

          These days I have been  using mass transit fairly often, which includes the city bus line. There are several “hubs: in the city where I live where one can change buses. There are always people sitting around and standing, waiting on their transfer to take place. There are also many homeless people who hang out at the hubs during the day. Many of them ride the buses on cool days to warm up, or to just have a place to sit comfortably.

              Recently I was waiting at one hub, waiting on my bus to go home, and I overheard a lady ask a young man what he was doing. He said simply, “I am just waiting around for my bus to take me home..”  The thought occurred to me, that was a perfect analogy of many Christians today. It seems that the body of Christ is full of people “Just waiting around for that Gospel bus to move them, or take them home.” all the while the homeless, sick, poor, and spiritually needy are sitting all around them, especially the lost.  Church members are just sitting around, waiting for something.  At the same time, there is an indignation that exudes from them over the profane and sinfulness of our nation, and many of our government leaders. The same inactive Christians waste no time in criticizing the state of our union. (see Romans 13:1 ff)

          But I am reminded of the verse in II Chronicles, chapter seven when the Lord speaks to Solomon about the people and the land, in connection with revival. God does not say for him to sit around and wait for the healing of the land to come, like folks waiting on that Gospel Bus. Rather, the Lord specifically states that it is up to HIS people to bring the healing, to usher in the revival primarily in three ways> The first is to bring a Sacrifice to the consecrated place of the Lord, and secondly to humble themselves, and thirdly to pray.

          We are not to sit around a wait for a revival in the land, or a healing of the land. We are to usher it in through our obedience to the Word of The Lord, and do our part. Not through complaining and criticism of the ungodly and lost, nor of the Government. No – we are to repent and pray as God’s house.

             I believe America will experience a cleansing and revival when the American Church repents, offer’s herself a living sacrifice, thru humility, and prays earnestly for our own healing first, then for the lost, the poor, and the government. If we are to experience revival, we need to remove the veil that covers our hearts, and really intercede for the lost. We need to really help the poor, and we need to uphold all of our leaders in prayer. If we want to see a return to morality in and through our government, we need to first obey the Word of the Lord, and then uplift our government in supportive prayer and intercession.

              It is time to stop waiting for the bus to come take us. It is time for us to put one spiritual foot in front of the other and stir up the gift that  is in us (II Timothy 1:6-7). Fan the flames of revival, properly and according to God’s will.  We as believers cannot afford to pick and choose what scripture we will listen to: we mus obey the full counsel of the Lord.